Terry Williams


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Name: Uncle Terry Williams
Occupation: Project Officer, Institute for Urban Indigenous Health
Place of Residence: Nundah, QLD
Tribe/Language: Goreng Goreng, Gangalu

The Bible comes before breakfast for Terry Williams, 63. “Over the years, I’ve found that the Word of God is best first thing in the morning. That’s my spiritual food. Then I can go and have my Weetbix and my juice,” he said.

Terry is married with 4 children and 3 grandchildren. His eldest son, David Williams, is an international football (soccer) player for A-League club Melbourne City.

Terry grew up in a family of 11 children. His father, brother and sister all died of alcohol-related deaths. “I was going the same pathway,” said Terry, “but my wife and my mother-in-law would pray for me and I went to church drunk and gave my life to the Lord back in 1981.”

Terry now works as a program manager for ‘Deadly Choices’ – an initiative of the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health in South East Queensland, funded by the Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing. ‘Deadly Choices’ aims to empower Indigenous and Torres Strait Islander people to make healthy choices; to stop smoking, eat well and exercise daily. “It’s about early intervention and preventative health,” said Terry.

“The Word of God and the Holy Spirit are connected. We can’t have one without the other. When we acknowledge the Word of God and the Holy Spirit working mightily in us each day we can step outside the door and be a witness for Jesus,” said Terry.

Terry’s ancestors are the Goreng Goreng and Gangulu Indigenous Australian tribes. “The Indigenous people of Australia…God has a special plan for them. I believe that God is going to put His Spirit in them to be a witness for Jesus to evangelise Australia.”

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